Evil Eye

Evil eye talismans are very prevalent throughout the Middle East, Africa, and Europe.  The evil eye is an envious or hateful look that is believed to cause harm on whomever meets its gaze.  Certain people are thought to wield especially potent powers when it comes to inflicting the curse of the evil eye on others. This bad luck often stems from envy and the “overlooking” associated with a fixation on or the coveting of another person.

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Belief in the evil eye is strongest in the Mediterranean region.  Muslims often ward off the evil eye by answering any complements with “mashallah,” (God has willed it).  In the Aegean region, where light-colored eyes are rare, those with green, and especially blue eyes, are thought to wield the power of the evil eye.  This belief may have arisen after people from cultures not used to the evil eye unintentionally transgressed local customs by staring or offering praise.  Thus, evil eye amulets in Greece and Turkey take the form of a blue eye.  In Israel, observant Jews believe that the 10th commandment “thou shalt not covet” is a law against inflicting the evil eye on another person.

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Apotropaic (protective) talismans have arisen in many cultures to ward off the evil eye.  They take the form of hanging discs, or small beads, and are often found in cars, on doorways, and on people’s bodies.

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Bedouin Hospitality

The Sinai Peninsula of Egypt, situated between the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Red Sea to the south, has some of the world’s best diving.  The Sinai is a fascinating place to visit for other reasons too.  It is the home to Mount Sinai, where Moses received the ten commandments, and beheld the burning bush, and to Saint Catherine’s Monastery.


It is also stunningly beautiful, it’s landscape craggy and reddish, and covered in sand.  I guess that’s what happens when two continents come crashing together.  The Sinai has traditionally been inhabited by Bedouins, a nomadic people who live in portable tents in the deserts of the Arabian peninsula.  They are renowned for their generous hospitality, which I can personally attest to.



I found myself slightly stranded on the Sinai last November while I was attempting to bus it (solo) from Cairo to Israel.  Due to several unforeseen challenges, I landed in Sharm al-Sheikh, the southern tip of the Sinai, at about 9 pm, only about halfway to Israel.  There I met a Spanish dive instructor, an Egyptian diver, and a Bedouin man who was offering to drive the three of us about 60 miles north to Dahab.  The Spanish woman promised me she had some Bedouin friends who owned a hostel on the beach, and she would take me there.  OK, I said, slightly annoyed that it would take me 2 full days to go 260 miles (ended up being 450 with previously mentioned unforeseen detours).  When I got to Dahab, the Bedouins were waiting for me with mint tea, conversation, cushions on the beach, and a HUGE plate of freshly caught fish.  When I woke up the next morning, I could not believe how beautiful the view was


I left the next morning to continue my trek to Israel, severely regretting not having realized how amazing the Sinai was.  I really want to go back, it is basically at the top of my list.  I would love to dive in Ras Mohammed National Park, climb Mount Sinai, and see St. Catherine’s.  I would also just like to spend more time with the Bedouins, a group of people I find fascinating and warm and strong.  They certainly taught me a lesson in serendipity and kindness when I could not have been more annoyed:  slow down, enjoy the ride, and eat some fish on the beach with some nice, new people.


The Israeli side of the Sinai, Eilat

And with this post, I am giving myself homework.  Two more posts: one on diving in Egypt, and one on Bedouins.  Due: this week.  Stay tuned.

Olive Oil Soap

Olive oil soap, made from olive oil and lye, is a Middle Eastern handicraft that dates back over a thousand years.  It is traditionally made in the Levant (Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Israel, Jordan) from 100% natural materials.  Essential oils and traditional herbs are often added to remedy skin ailments such as dandruff, rosacea, eczema, and acme, as well as to heal wounds and sooth insect bites.  Olive oil has long been known to serve as a deep moisturizer, regenerating and softening skin cells.  Olive oil soap can be found today in suqqs and in apothecary shops, and is still commonly made at home.



Check out Canaan Fair Trade to find out more info on olive oil soap, as well as other goods produced in Palestine.

Buy olive oil soap and support local artisans here.